• Health

    Time of day you exercise may lower risk of breast, prostate cancer

    Time of day you exercise may lower risk of breast, prostate cancer

    By Nancy Clanton, The Atlanta Journal-ConstitutionOct 21, 2020 Studies have found that exercise, even low-intensity activity, can lower the risk of dying from cancer. A new study suggests the time of day you exercise could affect risk of getting cancer. High levels of physical activity of any intensity, whether washing dishes or jogging, can lower the risk of an early death for middle-aged and older people, an April study suggested. A study published recently in the International Journal of Cancer adds to previous findings. Researchers analyzed data from 2,795 participants who

  • The State of American Souls, Must See TV and Trumpism
    Society

    The State of American Souls, Must See TV and Trumpism

    Trumpism is a term for the political ideology, style of governance, political movement and set of mechanisms for acquiring and keeping power as demonstrated by former president, Donald J. Trump. By Eileen FlemingOctober 12, 2020 Truth seekers will be glued to the TV this Tuesday when former U.S. president D. J. Trump’s second impeachment trial begins with the charge of inciting the January 6 insurrection on the Capitol. The former presidents defense lawyers are claiming a First Amendment defense. So far 144 Constitutional Lawyers have called the former presidents defense “legally frivolous”,

  • Ancient hominins used fire to make flint tools
    History

    Ancient hominins used fire to make flint tools

    A new study of these tools using spectroscopy and bioinformatics suggests skilled control over heating flint to produce different forms. By ISRAEL21c Staff OCTOBER 6, 2020 Our ancestors used fire to develop sophisticated technologies for making tools, say researchers at the Weizmann Institute of Science in Israel. The researchers used cutting-edge technologies of their own to take a fresh look at some of the tens of thousands of stone tools previously found in Qesem Cave, excavated by Prof. Avi Gopher and colleagues in Tel Aviv University. These tools date from the Lower Paleolithic era, between

  • Summer camps get creative to carry on in pandemic
    Leisure, Society

    Summer camps get creative to carry on in pandemic

    by Aaliyah Bowden, North Carolina Health NewsAugust 6, 2020 Eleven-year-old Averie M. spent time this summer learning how to zipline, rock climb and do gymnastics at a summer camp in Transylvania County. “The activities were very fun and you tried new things that you didn’t think you would be able to do,” she said. Averie was lucky to go to sleep-away camp this year when many other camps and activities for kids were shut down as a result of the coronavirus pandemic. Others camped from home on screens

  • The 3D Printed Homes of the Future Are Giant Eggs on Mars
    Technology

    The 3D Printed Homes of the Future Are Giant Eggs on Mars

    By Vanessa Bates RamirezJul 09, 2020 Last month, a 3D printed house that can float on a pontoon was unveiled in the Czech Republic. Last year, work started on a community of 3D printed houses for low-income families in Mexico. While building homes with 3D printers is becoming more scalable, it’s also still a fun way to play around with unique designs and futuristic concepts for our living spaces. It doesn’t get much more futuristic than living on Mars—and guess what? There’s a 3D printed home for that, too. In fact, there are a few;

  • Asheville’s Economy Relies on Tourists, But Advocates Caution Community Health Is at Risk
    Health

    Asheville’s Economy Relies on Tourists, But Advocates Caution Community Health Is at Risk

    by Taylor Sisk, 100 Days in AppalachiaJune 16, 2020 Among the communities hardest hit by the outbreak of COVID-19 are those that are heavily dependent on tourism. A recent study published on the website Volusion noted the disproportionate economic impact of the outbreak on retail, leisure and hospitality workers.  According to that study, Asheville, North Carolina, was among the top 10 small and midsize metro areas with the highest percentage of such workers.  Shannon Spencer is founder and director of the Asheville Poverty Initiative. Prior to the outbreak of the virus,

  • ‘Unbuilding’: What might happen if dams are removed in the Ohio River watershed
    Nature & Environment

    ‘Unbuilding’: What might happen if dams are removed in the Ohio River watershed

    by Eye On Ohio Staff, Eye on OhioMarch 23, 2020 The Ohio River watershed is dotted with thousands of small dams. Many are remnants of bygone days of grain mills and the steel industry, which used dams to pool water needed during production. The dams are no longer needed. And, because they can be a safety hazard to boats and a barrier to fish, there are efforts to remove them and restore free-flowing rivers. But not everyone is ready for it. A mayor’s vision starts with dam removal After years of

  • One Ohio River town that’s using outdoor recreation to boost its economy
    Leisure, Nature & Environment, Society

    One Ohio River town that’s using outdoor recreation to boost its economy

    by Eye On Ohio Staff, Eye on OhioNovember 21, 2019 Every September, tourists flock to historic Marietta, along the banks of the Ohio River, for a celebration that harkens back to the Ohio Valley’s early days.  The 44th annual Ohio River Sternwheel Festival held this year attracted an estimated 30,000 visitors to the small southeastern Ohio city. The streets buzzed with activity as vendors sold popcorn, french fries and locally made sandwiches.  More than 100 people sat along the riverbank on lawn chairs and blankets in the grass, looking out at

  • Outdoor preschool classroom will promote environmental learning, imaginative play
    Nature & Environment

    Outdoor preschool classroom will promote environmental learning, imaginative play

    by Alexis Shanes – NorthJersey.com, New Jersey Sustainability Reporting HubNovember 19, 2019 RIDGEWOOD — A new outdoor classroom at Bethlehem Early Learning Center will combine imaginative play with reading, math and environmental education for more than 100 preschool students. On Monday, a swarm of toddlers entered the classroom single-file, bundled in puffy coats to guard against the morning mist. Steppingstones made from tree stumps led the children past a heart-shaped turf patch and across a bridge to a little gathering area — and then back out again, through an entryway framed with wooden butterflies.

  • Inside the economics of illegal drugs, from cryptocurrencies to Major League Baseball
    Leisure, Society

    Inside the economics of illegal drugs, from cryptocurrencies to Major League Baseball

    by Clark Merrefield, The Journalist’s ResourceMay 31, 2019 Money and illegal drugs are inextricable. According to a 2014 RAND Corporation study commissioned by the White House Office of National Drug Control Policy, each year drug users buy about $100 billion combined worth of marijuana, methamphetamine, cocaine and heroin. The economic cost of opioid abuse, overdose and treatment alone reached $78.5 billion in the U.S. in 2013, according to one of the most recent and comprehensive studies from the National Institutes of Health. The Internet adds a modern wrinkle to the image of the drug